Trend and Keyword Tools Debunked for Web Writers

13 September, 2008

search engine marketing, seo, web content

I figured since I’ve been completely overwhlemed with keyword and trends tools that perhaps other writers and copy specialists are a bit boon-doggled, as well.

Here’s mixed run-down of popular and less well-known tools that let you drill down into various types of statistical data, like keywords, keyword phrases, hot topics and search trends–all very necessary clusters of information that many readers and clients hang their hats on …. right?

Trends:

Google Trends— important freebie from Google and if you want to know why G. can make so many of their apps free then you’ll definitely want to catch up with Chris Anderson’s Long Tail blog. He also wrote a demystifying cover story on the FREE information phenomena in Wired mag a few months ago. But, Google Trends– find out right now what today’s top searches have turned up, or search for your own keywords and return them in graph format, perfect for mining topics, keywords, etc over time. Incidentally, one of today’s top trends in search is for the keyphrase “to write love on her arms” What is it? A non-profit in Canada that helps people battle depression and self-injury. I’m not sure if that’s a good indication or bad….

Drill even deeper into Google search territory with new Google Insights for Search. This is a bit more complex tool, but spend a few minutes with it and you may find it fulfills a number of your needs including: search trends by topic, worldwide or by country, graph data by year(s), continue clicking into even more granular “insights” and rising search keywords and phrases. the tool also–of course–returns a short list of plain search results links that are tops for whatever topic you’re currently spelunking.

Google Trends for Websites, uh, a little bit of what you can find on Compete.com, but you may actually be able to get more granular info free with G. Follow the search terrain for websites, even compare multiples on a graph–sort by country and date, as well.

BlogPulse Trend tool lets you follow blog and “all consumer generated media (CGM)”. What’s cool is you can click spots on the graph to get a return of all the sources that posted on that topic for that specific date. the actual conversion point here is to net some visitors that will click through to BP’s Buzzmetrics–a pay for use tool.

Yahoo! Buzz— I’m not a Yahoo-er, but it’ll give you a breakout of the leading sites that have won Buzz Up votes (not a realistic or unbiased snapshot in my opinion), but you can also look to the righthand side of the page for Y’s top keyword searches on Yahoo right now and the’re not there b/c some bored surfer “buzzed” them.

Quintura is a really cool hybrid tool/resource. Think search engine crossed with ultimate keyword/phrase/trend tool PLUS a visual component that couldn’t get more intuitive. Start by typing your keywords into the search bar at the top and watch the keyword cluster/cloud bubble up along the left margin. Traditional search results to the right. This is quite semantic, too for linguists and keyword savants: just hover over a keword in the cloud and you’ll see a new sub-cloud that’s related to more granular search terms for that word. I can’t do it justice—Just check it out. 

More to come in my next post….

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3 Comments on “Trend and Keyword Tools Debunked for Web Writers”

  1. karren Says:

    lol good point there, way to go paris !!

    Reply

  2. karren Says:

    lol good point there, way to go Jennifer !

    Reply

  3. fdeblauwe Says:

    I found this article because I was trying to find out more about the difference between G trends and G Insights for Search. I had just posted on my Word Face-Off blog. Normally, I use G Trends only but 4 of my 5 search terms had zero data before 1-1-06, very odd. So I tried G Insights where they did have a complete data set. Does anybody have an explanation? I’m curious: is it just a different database of searches that is used?

    Reply

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